Welcome to St. George Catholic Church of Hartford, SD, located ten miles west of Sioux Falls, SD . Founded in 1882, we are older than the state of South Dakota and the Diocese of Sioux Falls. Though old, in 2010 we built a brand new and beautiful church to accommodate the growth of the Hartford area. We are a growing and thriving parish made up of many young families who wish to know, love, and serve God and his Church in this life and forever in the next. Currently we have 370 families and we are always adding more each month. All we need to have a perfect parish is you! Click here to learn how to join!
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Staff

Mass Times

Sunday Mass
Saturday @ 5:30 pm
Sunday @ 8:00 am & 10:30 am

Daily Mass
Tuesday & Thursday @ 5:30 pm
Wednesday & Friday @ 8:00 am
1st Saturday @ 8:30 am

Confession Times

Thursday: 6:15-7:00pm                                                                Saturday: 4:00-5:00pm                                                                             First Saturday: Before and after 8:30am Mass

Office Hours

Monday-Thursday
8:30 am-1:30 pm

For online books, movies, bible studies, talks and more sign up for the free parish program called FORMED.

 Register HERE. Use the parish code: Y883W7

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Saint George has made Online Giving available for our weekly offerings, as well as other parish collections. Donating is simple, safe, and secure and take less than five minutes.You’ll be able to give to any of our collections and view complete financial records at any time. Set up a one-time or recurring donation by following these three easy steps:

  1. Click on the Online Giving link.
  2. Select the collection you wish to donate to and click to make a donation.
  3. Enter your payment information.

That’s it. You can return at any time to edit your donation or to view your financial records.

Please contact Rechelle if you would like assistance.

Donation link for Elaina Wegleitner, St George parishioner who is participating in NET MINISTRIES for the next year. Thank you for your donation!

A Reflection

On December 1, the First Sunday of Advent, Pope Francis released a letter to the whole Church about the Christmas tradition of the Nativity Scene (or creche). It is a short letter encouraging each household to place a Nativity Scene in the center of their homes as well as businesses, schools and other public places. He writes us to encourage the beautiful family tradition of preparing the nativity scene in the days before Christmas, but also the custom of setting it up in the workplace, in schools, hospitals, prisons and town squares. Great imagination and creativity is always shown in employing the most diverse materials to create small masterpieces of beauty. As children, we learn from our parents and grandparents to carry on this joyful tradition, which encapsulates a wealth of popular piety. It is my hope that this custom will never be lost and that, wherever it has fallen into disuse, it can be rediscovered and revived. Pope Francis continues:

Why does the Christmas crèche arouse such wonder and move us so deeply? First, because it shows God’s tender love: the Creator of the universe lowered himself to take up our littleness. The gift of life, in all its mystery, becomes all the more wondrous as we realize that the Son of Mary is the source and sustenance of all life. In Jesus, the Father has given us a brother who comes to seek us out whenever we are confused or lost, a loyal friend ever at our side. He gave us his Son who forgives us and frees us from our sins.

Setting up the Christmas crèche in our homes helps us to relive the history of what took place in Bethlehem. Naturally, the Gospels remain our source for understanding and reflecting on that event. At the same time, its portrayal in the crèche helps us to imagine the scene. It touches our hearts and makes us enter into salvation history as contemporaries of an event that is living and real in a broad gamut of historical and cultural contexts.

In a particular way, from the time of its Franciscan origins, the nativity scene has invited us to “feel” and “touch” the poverty that God’s Son took upon himself in the Incarnation. Implicitly, it summons us to follow him along the path of humility, poverty and self-denial that leads from the manger of Bethlehem to the cross. It asks us to meet him and serve him by showing mercy to those of our brothers and sisters in greatest need (cf. Mt 25:31-46).

On this Bambinelli Sunday, when we bless the figures of the Child Jesus that you will use in your Nativity Scenes, I hope that you will be encouraged to keep this tradition in your families. ~Fr King